The process of differentiated instructions involves how the students learn the material (Tomlinson, 2001) and (Gregory, 2005).

Learning Logs

Journals
The teacher provides a few different journal prompts or questions based on student need and readiness on the concepts.

Graphic Organizers

Creative Problem Solving

Cubing
The students are given a six sided cube with instructions written on each of the six sides. The students roll the die to determine the instructions they are to follow. Teachers may opt to use two or three different cubes based on students’ ability levels. For example, one cube could have more complex instructions and demands than the other.

Blank Cube Template


Sample Cube

Sample Cube

Think Cube

Cubing...Levels of Thinking
  1. Tell, Describe, Recall, Name, Locate, List
  2. Compare, Contrast, Example, Explain, Define, Write
  3. Connect, Make, Design, Produce, Develop
  4. Review, Discuss, Prepare, Diagram, Cartoon
  5. Propose, Suggest, Finish, Prescribe, Devise
  6. Debate, Formulate, Choose, Support, In your opinion...


Learning Centers
  • Choice Centers - The students may be given a select choice from which to further explore.
  • Math Rotation Centers
  • Thematic Centers

Literature Circles

Role Playing

Cooperative Controversy
The students argue both sides of an issue.

Choice Boards
Students are able to pick three learning activities in a row, the four corners, or creating their own in the center.

Choice Board sample for multiple intelligences


Retrieved from, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGbulODMVgM&feature=related


Jigsaw

Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOXWdADUgW8&feature=related


Think-Pair_Share

Mind-Mapping

PMI
The students list pluses, minuses, and interesting points about a topic under consideration.

Model Making

Labs

Tiered Assignments

Parallel Tasks

Home


References

Chapman, C. & Gregory, G.H., (2007). Differentiated instructional strategies: One size doesn't fit all, second edition. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.

Gregory, G.H., (2005). Differentiating instruction with style; Maximum achievement. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.

Tomlinson, C. A. (2001). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.